Seeing what the Chain Saw

Just before deciding to waste an afternoon getting a finger tended to, I had been trying the new Husqvarna out slicing up a bit of firewood (gathered from the side of the road years ago).

Chainsaw went very well – slicing easily through what now looks like to be spotted gum.  Instead of destined for the fireplace, I guess this cube is now going to become something a bit more interesting.  No idea what yet.  That’s the problem with being a woodworker – even something destined for the fireplace gets assessed whether it is better diverted to the shed!

The clamp I am using here is one of the original (Australian made!!) Superjaws.  It has the upgraded (newer) version of the log jaws that bite strongly into the log, and where there is a heavy, soft bark, these jaws bite right through.  An excellent tool to take to the job site where you need to make the job of chopping up firewood a lot safer (that is just one of the jobs I use the SJ for).

I’m quite pleased with the Husky as well – about as powerful as you can get on a 10A supply, and although you can get larger petrol chainsaws with more power, longer bars, this one did the job.  Perhaps needing a bit more time to complete a cut required (although to get more power in a petrol model would cost a lot more), but for a home user- an excellent tool.

There is a definite advantage to the convenience of an electric saw, especially in the shed.  Not having to get the engine running, dealing with fumes etc.

Just another look at those jaws.  The rear jaw is singular, so the timber/log is held in a triangular pinch – no point trying to use jaws with 4 points – ever seen a log with truly parallel sides?

I did set the saw into the Torque Workcentre slabbing attachment this weekend, but didn’t get any results to write about.  Will have to do some more experiments to work out how to get the best out of the attachment.  It clamps the chain bar well – certainly feels like a secure arrangement, but couldn’t seem to get the saw to cut.  I know it works well when freehand – especially given what it did to the spotted gum (where I tried both rips and crosscuts), so some more testing needed.  It could be I didn’t have the blade parallel to the table, or the test piece I decided to use was too green/gummy or something.  I’m tending to wonder about the parallelism because about 1/2 way through the cut I was seeing an increasing wavy surface – indicative of a blade trying to cut in one direction, and forced to cut in another, but I didn’t have time to pursue this further.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: