Still juggling….

Looks like it will just be MagSwitch (on the Carbatec Stand) and Professional Woodworkers Supplies now, so should be able to lock in some times soon.

Not much else happening above the water – duck’s legs going frantically underneath however with a number of things in process.  Won’t have time for another video until after the show (and once the voice recovers from it!)

Got out to the shed (late) last night – too late to get much done, but did get to sit down, catch a show (rewatching Firefly fwiw), and go through all my containers of screws, nails etc and get them into some sort of semblance of order (at least with the right contents in the right container).  Still want to make some new ones out of wood, but until then, the plastic ones will still have to do.

Oh, and there is some plan to hold a garage sale in early November, so want to go through the sheds to see what tools are no longer required which are taking up valuable space.

Finally, I managed to get back to Carbatec and pick up the velcro disk for the 3 in 1 (converting its disk sander to one with removable paper as well), and some thin, pinned scrollsaw blades for the Triton scrollsaw to see if that improves its functionality.

A quick trial in some MDF that got too close to the blade gave an indication that the new blades do make an improvement, but I still have an overall difficulty in that you cannot manually set the blade tension, and the as-supplied setting is not tight enough.  However, this is aleviated somewhat by getting a much thinner blade, as it doesn’t take as much force to get the required tension.  So the note the blade generated was only a C flat, but at least it could produce a note!

A better sander

The sanding disk on my 2 in 1 Triton sander was getting quickly worse, with little sanding and more burning, no matter how often I tried the reconditioning rubber stick trick.

The cutting ability of the sanding disk had finally been exhausted – it was blunt.  Given that it was silicon carbide, which chips revealing new cutting edges, it means it had pretty much run out of carbide altogether.

Now before applying a new disk, you have to completely clean off all the glue from the old one, and given this glue is strong and gunky, I really don’t relish the task (and thus why the disk was so far gone).

So instead of having to do this more than once, I decided to upgrade the tool at the same time, with a velcro disk (yes, it actually is velcro) from Carbatec.  It is a pretty low cost fix, and will save a lot of grievance in the future.  Velcro can’t take the same level of heat abuse from oversanding (or rather overpressure during the sanding), so I’m going to have to use it without abusing it, but that isn’t such a bad thing.

Removing original disk

Removing original disk

Step 1 was removing the original disk that had expired and clean all the residual glue off.  It was as much fun as I expected.

Attached Velcro Surface

Attached Velcro Surface

Step 2 The velcro disk is attached.  In this case it was an 8″ disk – cost $18 from Carbatec.

New Silicon Carbide Disk Attached

New Silicon Carbide Disk Attached

New carbide disk attached – cost $5.50.  In this case it is an 80 grit, but there is obviously a whole range available, and easily swappable now with the velcro backing.

2 in 1 back in service

2 in 1 back in service

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