A First Box

Suppose that is a little misleading – I have made boxes before, but not with an attention to the joint, nor, from memory, with the use of nice timbers and it to have cosmetic appeal as well as a function.  Who knows why – I’ve gone as far as proving the joint can be made (by me that is!), and the other specific construction areas, but hadn’t actually bought them together to create a finished object.

So this is what I have come up with.  I’ve given away the sliding lid, and instead went for a shallow rebate around the lid for a close fitted separate one.  Leaving hinges for another day, and for a box with thicker walls (at least initially).  I’d also like to try to make wooden hinges, but again – not for this box!

Mulga Box

Mulga Box

The finish is very simple, which I like – I’ve given it a sand to about 220 grit with a ROS (random orbital), then applied Ubeaut Traditional Wax.  This was then bought to the final finish with a good buff with a Ubeaut Swansdown mop, mounted in the drill press.  I haven’t used it for smaller objects before (that weren’t turning on the lathe that is), so have always had it mounted in a hand drill.  Having it mounted in a fixed tool and bringing the work to the mop was so much easier! (Of course working on large furniture which is the last thing I used it on doesn’t exactly give you that option!)

UBeaut Swansdown Mop

UBeaut Swansdown Mop

It might look dirty etc, but it needs to have a significant wax buildup in the mop before it actually becomes functional, otherwise it just sucks the wax right out of the project!

Episode 24 Tool Maintenance Cast Iron and Sanders

Episode 24 Tool Maintenance Cast Iron and Sanders
For anyone not living in absolute ideal conditions, cast iron is not only magnetic, but “magnetically” attracts rust to it, and so it is important to both protect against rust, and be able to remove any ‘infection’ as soon as it starts.

Unorthodox Triton Router Table Mod Part 1

I’ve had a few queries about my unusual table top in my recent post about Router Tables. So to cause a bit of controversy, here is the article I wrote at the time about the modification. To clarify however, I still use an original, unmodified Triton Router Table quite successfully, so this is another one of those “I’ll always try to modify everything kind of thing!”

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I have been using the Triton Router Table for a few years now (with the Triton Router pretty much permanently mounted), and have found it to be an excellent way of performing most router operations. In fact, other than some totally unavoidable operations where I need to do freehand routing, I wouldn’t dream of not using a router table. As things have progressed, I have been expecting more and more from my equipment, in their capabilities, and accuracies, and have been reaching a point where I needed to use bigger and bigger router bits, and/or a very high degree of accuracy. As I have written in another article, (which I’ll post here soon) the micro-adjusters for the Triton Router Table are excellent for achieving precise fence movements.

When using some very large router bits (such as for raised panel joints), I found that the Router Template Guide plate got in the way, so I wasn’t able to lower the bit far enough to achieve the cut that I wanted. To get around this, I had three options. The first was really not an option at all (lowering the router). The second was raising the work, which although ok, made it difficult to achieve the same setup every time (you don’t want each door on a raised panel cabinet looking different!) The final solution was to make the Triton Router Table top thicker. This had an added benefit of allowing a 1-piece top, which meant that there was no chance for the front edge of a piece of work to catch the top of the table at all, or worse, experience any dip or rise as it progressed past the router bit.

Photo 1 – Original Triton Router Table

There were a few things that I demanded of the upgrade.
1. Retain the ability to use the fence, perform through-table bit changing, and still be able to use the various router table jigs (finger joiner, biscuit joiner, jigsaw table).

2. The modification must be fully reversible, which adds an extra dimension to the design.

3. The table must still be able to take a full range of bit sizes, from the 3mm Triton bit, through to panel making bits, without ending up with a huge cavity when using the smaller bits.

4. Safety must not be compromised.
My solution was to attach a new single piece of aluminium sheet over the entire tabletop, while still leaving the slot for the sliding portion uncovered, and therefore usable as originally intended. After much thought, I finally clicked to the best way to do this- attach the new top to the removable router holding plate, so that it gets removed at the same time as the router is.

Click here to read full article

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