A First Box

Suppose that is a little misleading – I have made boxes before, but not with an attention to the joint, nor, from memory, with the use of nice timbers and it to have cosmetic appeal as well as a function.  Who knows why – I’ve gone as far as proving the joint can be made (by me that is!), and the other specific construction areas, but hadn’t actually bought them together to create a finished object.

So this is what I have come up with.  I’ve given away the sliding lid, and instead went for a shallow rebate around the lid for a close fitted separate one.  Leaving hinges for another day, and for a box with thicker walls (at least initially).  I’d also like to try to make wooden hinges, but again – not for this box!

Mulga Box

Mulga Box

The finish is very simple, which I like – I’ve given it a sand to about 220 grit with a ROS (random orbital), then applied Ubeaut Traditional Wax.  This was then bought to the final finish with a good buff with a Ubeaut Swansdown mop, mounted in the drill press.  I haven’t used it for smaller objects before (that weren’t turning on the lathe that is), so have always had it mounted in a hand drill.  Having it mounted in a fixed tool and bringing the work to the mop was so much easier! (Of course working on large furniture which is the last thing I used it on doesn’t exactly give you that option!)

UBeaut Swansdown Mop

UBeaut Swansdown Mop

It might look dirty etc, but it needs to have a significant wax buildup in the mop before it actually becomes functional, otherwise it just sucks the wax right out of the project!

Burl Clock

After having a couple of inquiries, thought I’d post a brief description of the Burl Clock, seen in the Gallery.

clock.jpg

The burl (and clock mechanism) were purchased at the Working with Wood show. Total cost: $40.  The mechanism came from Jonathon Knowles Clocks.

The face has been planed and sanded to get it reasonably flat, then the sanding to produce the finish. Each sandpaper grade was used, between 120 and 1200, all on a Triton Random Orbital sander.  The ROS is used because its eccentric sanding pattern doesn’t leave the telltale swirls (scratches) of a normal orbital sander.

The finish was produced first by rubbing Ubeaut Shellawax Cream across the face until the cloth started to grab. It was then buffed with a Ubeaut Swansdown mop attached to a drill. Next, Ubeaut EEE Ultrashine was used to produce a satin finish, again with the Swansdown mop.

The cavity for the clock mechanism was made using the Triton Router (handheld), using a template guide and straight router bit.

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