Episode 107 Miniature Copy Bit

 

Bowled Over

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Routing a bowl, using the Amana Tool bowl bits from Toolstoday.com

Including rounding over the edge with about the smallest 1/4″ roundover bit there is (and the smallest bearing I think I’ve ever seen too!)

Check out the next edition of The Shed magazine for a full description and step by step for making this project.

A pocket tool chest

As highlighted on The Toolchest Site, and bought to my attention by Joel on the Stu’s Shed Facebook page (thanks!)

This is not a Swiss Army knife or Leatherman (the typical pocket toolbox), but instead is a stunning replica of an 18th century gentleman’s tool chest, packed with tools. The whole chest is a massive 2 inches long. It is a 1/12 scale in stunning detail of the Hewitt chest at Colonial Williamsburg, by miniaturist William Robertson.
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The tool chest was made with the same construction as the original chest from a timber that looks like the original mahogany when seen in scale. Tool trays and drawers are fully dovetailed with hand-sawn dust boards. The dividers are v-notched and crosslapped and the lid sides are tongue and groove.

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Robertson’s tool chest contains all the same tools that were found in the original. All the tools work, even the plane’s tote (handle) is set a scale 1/8″ to one side as the original. The saw has 160 teeth to the inch. The most challenging tool to make was the folding rule with 5 leaf hinge. It is about .030″ thick and hand engraved on boxwood.

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Also included in the tool chest are a Kent-style hatchet, claw hammer, a riviting hammer, marking gauge, five gimlets, a smooth plane, backsaw, saw wrest, divider, awl, round file, burnisher, inside/outside calipers, bevel gauge, try square, three turnscrews, four brad awls, an oilstone in its case, three tanged chisels, a mallet and a beak anvil. All the tools are fully functional, with blades made of steel. Other parts are made from brass with handles made of pearwood, boxwood, African blackwood, Bolivian rosewood and maple.

The chest and tools took about 1,000 hours to complete. I have no idea of its value, but if you estimated it as cheap as $50/hr, that is a LOT of toolchest.

Miniature Real Estate

And so it begins- hopefully it can be completed before my daughter’s birthday, this one or the next….. and not have it take so long that she will learn to read, let alone read this blog! Better be finished before she gets too old to play with it, let alone turn 16, 21 etc!

It will be a long, drawn out affair, with much construction required, including many turnings. Dolls houses can be quite complex things when done properly!

As a bit of a test, I made this vase (Huon Pine) using typical techniques, just on a small scale.

The flower was something whipped up with Jessie out of pipecleaners until I can make something suitable.

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It is about 20mm high. (Sorry for the image quality- taken on a mobile phone)

Veritas Miniature Shoulder Plane

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The Veritas Miniature Shoulder Plane is a stunning, tiny plane, that is still very functional (almost as an added bonus!) It is made from stainless steel, using the investment-cast process. It has a fixed mouth, with a machined sole and ground sides. A low 15° bed angle combined with the 25° blade bevel provides a 40° cutting angle.

The investment-cast process is a lost-wax casting process, where the original item is carved out of wax, from which a cast is made (and the wax is then melted out and “lost”). Into this mould, a ceramic copy is made. This is used to produce the future moulds, and is called the “investment”

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Does this make it a “palm plane”?

The plane is well designed, and can be used in catching and squaring up the small corners at the bottom of a dado.

Compared to a normal plane, it is significantly tiny!

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Available from Carbatec. You’ll have to ask for them at the counter – they are unlikely to be dumpred on the shelves – too small and desirable. Cost is around $35- not sure exactly.

And if you are thinking of joining the woodworking Mob, it makes for an essential fashion accessory 😉

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