The (ex) Triton Engineers have done it again!

To be fair, I don’t know that for certain, but I strongly suspect it, and can see their design philosophy in this new, or rather reworked, product.

First there was the roller stand, which evolved into version 2.0, the Multistand

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I always had about 4 of these “hanging” around.

This became version 2.1 when its manufacturing was sent offshore to China. No real change, but it picked up some black boots on each foot.

This version is still current and in store at places like Carbatec, Amazon etc.

Now I was having a scout around the web, and came across

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The Rockwell JawStand! Given the (ex) Triton engineers who designed the original SuperJaws came up with the magnificent JawHorse

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You can understand why I strongly suspect their involvement in the JawStand.

I suspect they have not arrived in Oz, but nevertheless, I want one! (Or two)

To clarify a point, overseas, Rockwell is the premiere brand for the company, whereas in Australia you are looking for Worx Pro.

Given what they have done to the SuperJaws, and now the Multistand, I wonder if they will ever turn their attention to the Workcentre or Router Table? Sadly, I doubt it, but wouldn’t it be cool?

How about a reworked extension table designed as an aftermarket product for cabinet saws?

An Unexpected Arrival

Got home today to find a rather unexpected, but very welcome parcel sitting on the doorstep….

The Worx Professional Jawhorse, in a rather cool grey and green.  (It did arrive in a box, just decided to take the photos on the porch).  An awesome tool, and I’d expect this means now down under!  What many have been hanging out for eh?!  It is in the Pro Green, so worth looking out for that rather than the orange colour scheme of the standard Worx range (and the Aussie-branded Rockwell).  This unit is the same as the US Rockwell Jawhorse that I’ve spoken about on here in the past.

Has a stylish look, especially the colour scheme, but this is fundamentally a workhorse of the workshop.  Versatile, very stable, yet very portable and can be folded up for storage talking up a very small shop footprint.

The label says it all.  Near 20kg in weight, it can clamp up to 940mm, and with a tonne of clamping force (1000kg, not the 1 Ton stated on the label!), and can support up to 272kg of weight.

It has a good jaw opening in the normal rear jaw orientation.  For increased range (without some of the optional jaws that may not be available in Australia), the jaw is reversed, giving the maximum 940mm range.

The back of the rear jaw is made from the same urethane, so it is rigid, yet with some degree of give which prevents marking of the clamped object.

At the front of the Jawhorse below the label, there is a wide wheel.  It is useful for moving the Jawhorse over a distance if you don’t want to carry it’s 20kg bulk.

The rear leg can be extended out to be a sort of handle, for pushing or pulling the Jawhorse around.

The clamping operation is done via the footpedal.  The 100kg (max) force that you exert on the pedal is multiplied 10 times by the mechanism to produce the 1000kg clamp force.  To move the jaw over a range, there is a toothed end to the bar connected to the pedal which engages the bottom of the moveable jaw, indexing it along.

The jaw can be slid when the pedal is not engaged, and twin spring loaded bearings maintain a constant pressure on the underside of the moveable jaw track.

The innocuous, yet powerful teeth which transfers the 1 tonne force into the jaws.

The jaw pressure is maintained while force is applied to the foot pedal.  The Jawhorse can be used in that mode, acting as a horizontal press, or by flicking the ‘switch’ to the lock position, the foot pedal is maintained at the maximum pressure that was achieved.  The switch can be engaged once the desired pressure is achieved, or can be flicked on before that final stroke leaving both hands free to support the workpiece.

When opening the unit up from its storage orientation, the front legs have a tidy spring-loaded latch concealed behind the leg.  This is a rather neat solution for maintaining the legs in the open position.

The front legs angle outwards sideways, but are still pretty close to remaining in the same vertical plane as the front jaws, allowing the top working surface to be used as an anvil.  With the wide front legs and the single back leg, the unit is both stable on uneven surfaces, but has a large footprint making it stable when supporting large, heavy objects.

With the unit upside down, and the front legs folded down, the footpedal folds back, trapping the legs in position.

The rear leg then folds over, and engages into a slot in the front-rear of the Jawhorse, trapping the legs and footpedal in position.  It then becomes a handy handle for lugging the unit around.

When the unit is not in use, it can be folded up and stored on-end to minimise the unit’s footprint.

So that is the mean, green Worx Professional Jawhorse.

If you haven’t seen or read about me talking on it before, you may wonder how such a beast can exist, being so similar to the Triton Superjaws.  A large number of factors, including the now defunct GMC not maintaining the Superjaws patent, along with them not retaining the Triton engineering staff, meant that when this staff went to work for Positec (the parent company of Worx and Rockwell), they were able to produce the ultimate Superjaws – the Jawhorse.

120 Days and Counting

The word is out (well actually the word is only out because you’ve just read it here first!)

The Pro Jawhorse (which will be known in Australia as the Worx Pro JawHorse) will be here in around 120 days!  The order has been placed, the boat has sailed (or soon will), and this machine that I’ve had in my workshop since 13 Jan 09 (he he he) will be on the shelves in 3 months.

To remind you, this is the machine we are talking about (in this case with the US branding)

US Branded version

Australian Version (?)

And alongside the Chinese manufactured version of the SuperJaws (all designed by the same Australian (once Triton) engineers)

Genetically modified

So not long now – you will soon be able to have one of these beasts in your own shed, with the large jaws, huge opening capacity, tonne of clamping pressure, rodent killing, child rearing, money making, cattle rustling (ok, ok)  It is a cool tool 🙂

The price is still to be finalised, but you will get change out of $230.  Whether that is $1 or $31 or somewhere in between is yet to be worked out, but it is that ballpark.  Now you will be able to stop being envious of mine and have one for yourself!

If it’s Pretty in Pink…

A winner in (Telecom) Gold, what is it in Ryobi Blue?

Thanks to Sparhawk for the pics- can’t believe how wrong the SuperJaws looks in blue, and particularly how irksome seeing the traditional Superjaws logo on a non Triton branded box.

Bet Ryobi, and Bunnings are laughing long and hard at Triton & GMC, finally scoring the best tool Triton ever produced (although I’m not a big fan of the Chinese manufactured version).

It is interesting reading some American user reviews and opinions of the JawHorse- some really don’t “get it”. At least one went on and on how unstable a 3 legged one would be- how much more stable a 4 leg one would be (I still think they are under the misconception that a Superjaws or Jawhorse is some form of sawhorse).

SSYTC009 Rockwell JawHorse

Update – a clarification required:

The Rockwell JawHorse seen in the following video will be sold as the Worx Pro, and most Worx Pro tools will be green in colour.  The current Rockwell JawHorse in Australia (let’s call it the Junior JawHorse) is also sold as an orange Worx model (not Worx Professional).  Really, there isn’t any real confusion here, other than the fact that because my site goes out worldwide so I have to clarify the similarities and differences between different offerings.  If this was an Australian dedicated website, or a US one or whatever, it would be a lot more striaghtforward!!

——————————–

The Rockwell JawHorse has been designed by the same engineers who came up with the original Triton SuperJaws – a tool that I have found indispensable in my workshop for many years for a whole raft of roles. The JawHorse can be considered the latest iteration in the development path, being larger and stronger than any previous model, and with some really nice refinements that long time users would appreciate, including spring-powered leg retaining tongues for the front legs, even larger, stronger jaws, and some really interesting accessories to boot.

I regularly use the JawHorse as a clamp – be that for boxes, or panels, or pretty anything else that needs gripping/ constricting, as a press for bearings, as a bike stand for bike maintenance, as a press for assembling the most delicate of wooden pens, for holding logs while chainsawing, for holding metal components while welding, as an anvil, as a tool stand (either in the shop or on location) and as a vice, just to name a few.

To me, it is an integral part of my workshop tools (and in fact I have 3 of them (2 being the old SuperJaws) – I had 5 at one stage!!)

My simple answer to anyone contemplating getting one, is simply do it, and thank me later!  There are not many tools that I’d say that about without assessing the specific needs of that person – this tool is so versatile I can’t think of anyone it wouldn’t suit.  That’s about the strongest endorsement I’ve given any tool, ever.

If you are in the US/Canada (or normally buy from Rockler), you can get the JawHorse and its accessories from here.  Yes, I do get a commission if you buy via that link, but my whole hearted endorsement has NOTHING to do with any potential sales.  I’d say exactly the same irrespective.  I don’t mind getting a commission for any sales though 🙂 If you are in Australia, you can get the smaller brother of this tool at Mitre 10 (also called the Rockwell JawHorse which has very similar capabilites to the Chinese made Superjaws). If you are particularly interested in the model shown here, it will be available in Oz later this year under the brand Worx Pro.  Sadly, I don’t get any commissions from those sales!!

Watch the video, see what you think, and by all means ask any questions, or raise any concerns you may have.

A Burl Clock for the Shed

To start the process, I’ve been preparing the burl slab itself, and the first part of that was the recent YouTube Chronicles video, running the burl through the drum sander.

Next, I took the random orbital sander to the surface, starting with the unusually coarse (for me) 80 grit paper (the burl is very hard), and continued through the grits to 400. For previous clocks I would normally oil the surface (with a burnishing oil), but in this case I didn’t think it would be needed to get the grain to show up, and I didn’t know how the Liquid Glass would respond to it.

I’ve then flipped the board over to mill out a cavity for the clock mechanism.

Creating the Template

Creating the Template

I needed a template to route out the opening, so started down the tradition path – marking out the opening, drilling holes, cutting with a jigsaw, filing off the jigsaw marks, and all the while I was thinking to myself – there has to be a better way. Then I remembered the Sonicrafter that I previewed for the manufacturers – one of the high vibrating speed cutting tools (takes different blades etc, the well known version is the Fein). This one is Worx brand (the bigger brother of the Rockwell that has recently hit the Aussie market) It will be in the marketplace soon fwiw. I gave it a try, and it worked like a dream – the perfect tool for the job. In future it will be the first tool I turn to for jig creation! I made the template out of MDF, and before you ask why I didn’t just cut the actual opening this way: burl is really hard, and I think any of these cutters would probably struggle, and secondly, and more importantly, I needed the opening in the burl to be a partial depth only.

A big reason for me using this tool, is I can cut a square opening, with straight sides a lot easier than my older methods!

The opening in the template is larger than the actual clock mechanism, as it needs to take into account the distance between the outside of the template and the router bit. I set the router bit depth, taking into account the thickness of the burl, the length of shaft of the clock, and the various components that are attached.

Router Bit Depth Set

Router Bit Depth Set

I used the Wixey Digital Height Gauge to set the height accurately. So once I had the template, this was clamped to the burl, and the opening created with the router.

Mechanism Opening

Mechanism Cavity

A perfect opening

A perfect opening (centre still to be removed)

The above-image has the outside routed to full depth, but as you can see the middle area needs another pass.

Back of Burl Clock

Back of Burl Clock

So this is the back complete.  I tend to leave it raw so I can see the difference in the finished front and the raw back when I want to.  I know this is not best practice, if for no other reason than it can encourage warping when the stock is thin.  Still, it’s a choice I make (in some circumstances).

Oh, and for the doubters, yes I do use my JawHorse, all the time, and for almost every project!

Next post will be about finishing the front.

Rockwell JawHorse Commercial

This is the commercial for the Rockwell JawHorse that will be featuring on FoxSports in July (in Australia).

The Rockwell JawHorse itself will also be available in July.  The Worx JawHorse (which is the Rockwell JawHorse in the USA) which has been featured on this website will be available later this year.

Latest writeup here: SSYTC009 Rockwell JawHorse

The Rockwell JAWHORSE

Rockwell Jawhorse HD RK9000 Workbench System - As Seen on TV!
Rockwell Jawhorse HD RK9000 Workbench System – As Seen on TV!

My photos of the JawHorse available in this post here ==>(click for new window)

I have just returned from a mind-blowing 1 1/2 hours with the designers and engineers (and Managing Director) of the company responsible for the Rockwell JawHorse, and it is in one word: AWESOME!

The Triton SuperJaws has grown up, and it already was a serious tool.  I couldn’t tell from the photos whether the JawHorse was the equal of the old, or new SuperJaws – it certainly looked similar in form and function, and they were both designed by the same engineers (and a bit freaky for me, they occasionally visit this site (and I’m sure have a laugh at my expense on occasion)).  My hope (and expectation) was that the JawHorse would be as good as the SuperJaws (and readers of this site would know that I am a big fan of the SuperJaws, and in fact have 3 or 4 of them (I’ve lost count)).  I was not expecting to discover the JawHorse would be superior, but that is most definitely the case.

Speaking of photos, I couldn’t even wait to take any photos of the unit before writing this article – so will have to add more details (and photos) over the next day or so.

See – I am still getting ahead of myself.  There is a JawHorse sitting in the back of my car, just waiting for me to get it into the shed and putting it through its paces.

So, to answer a few initial questions I had about this tool:

It is definitely the equal (and obviously superior to) the SuperJaws.

If you have seen the infomercials about it, and wonder if it can really do what they are making out (as we all have doubts in the back of our minds about what we are told in infomercials), the answer is a resounding YES.  This is a serious tool, and it is worth every cent.  It will last for years – my first SuperJaws has taken a lot of use and abuse and is now about 8 years old, and is still going strong.  I still haven’t gotten around to making a workbench for my shed, and it is the fault of this tool – as a clamp, as a press, as a work platform, as a tool support, it is the bees knees.  From clamping the lightest, weakest materials together, through to applying up to a tonne of clamping force – it is that versatile.

It is coming to Australia around the 3rd quarter of this year, under the brand Worx Professional.  (And unlike Triton at the moment, which because of the receivership has to be sold without warranty, the JawHorse has a 5 year warranty).

There are also a bunch of accessories that are available for it as well, and I will hopefully be able to bring you a lot more detail of them in a month or so – the Mitre Saw Station I did get to see in the flesh, and it looks brilliant.  There are log jaws that can also hold your chainsaw for blade resharpening with foldout secondary clamping points, supplementary jaws that owners of Black & Decker Workmates would recognise as the top of a Workmate – imagine a Workmate with 1000kgs of clamping pressure (although I don’t think they would support the full loading that the JawHorse is capable of applying, although I may be wrong.  1 tonne is a lot of clamping force for the edge of a workmate jaw to cope with!)

So that is just an initial reaction to this tool.  I can now bring a lot more detail to you over the next few days, and there is so much more to see that will impress the hell out of existing SuperJaw owners, let alone anyone that doesn’t have one (yet).  If you are debating whether to get one……stop debating and just do it.  Seriously.

If you have any questions about the tool, I’m now obviously in a much better position to be able to answer them, and if I can’t, I know who can!

Latest writeup here: SSYTC009 Rockwell JawHorse

Rockwell Jaw Horse

UPDATE: Review and photos of the Jaw Horse in my shed are now available here and here

There appears to be a significant increase in popularity recently in the JawHorse, and from looking at the Rockwell website, my guess is that a. it is now being advertised on TV in the states, and through the Infomercial channels, and b. it is not being sold in shops and can only be purchased online.

I’ve been looking to contact the manufacturer to see if they’d be interested in having their product independently covered in a more comprehensive Stu’s Shed review, but there appears to be no email address readily available, and I’m not planning on ringing the States (yet). (If anyone wants to give them a head-up….. 😉 – To find me, all they have to do is Google JawHorse, and click on the first (non-animal) link!)

If it is assuring to anyone who has come here to get some more background on this tool before making a purchase, I can say that it is based on a tool here called the Superjaws, which is a brilliant machine, and does everything I ask of it – strength, clamping pressure, longevity, stability, quality. (I have 3 or 4 of them now – loose count!)

I have not seen a JawHorse in the flesh (so to speak), but so long as it is manufactured to the same level of quality as the Superjaws, it will definitely do the job!  Of course, you could always just buy a Superjaws, but I don’t think they are sold in the same markets, so there isn’t a direct conflict there (yet).

UPDATE: Review and photos of the Jaw Horse in my shed are now available here and here

Latest writeup here: SSYTC009 Rockwell JawHorse

Rockwell Jawhorse HD RK9000 Workbench System – As Seen on TV!
As seen on TV, this heavy-duty hands-free clamp not only secures workpieces with a rock-solid grip, its wide stable frame instantly provides a go-anywhere workstation to make cuts, drill holes, and more. Hold and cut doors, two-by-fours, two-by-twelves, and odd-shaped objects. Mount miter saws, tile saws, grinders and other tools to wood panels and use the Jawhorse as a sturdy stand. Clamp in a vertical support piece and install crown molding all by yourself.

Do it all and more with this incredibly versatile tool that also folds up for simple storage and transportation.

Rockwell Jawhorse HD RK9000 Workbench System – As Seen on TV!

Rockwell Jawhorse HD RK9000 Workbench System - As Seen on TV!
Miter Saw Station for Jawhorse RK9000
Miter Saw Station for Jawhorse RK9000

Work Table for Jawhorse RD9000
Work Table for Jawhorse RD9000

Welding Jaw for Jawhorse RK9000
Welding Jaw for Jawhorse RK9000

Log Jaw for Jawhorse RK9000
Log Jaw for Jawhorse RK9000

Saddlebag for Jawhorse RK9000
Saddlebag for Jawhorse RK9000

Plywood Jaw for Jawhorse RK9000
Plywood Jaw for Jawhorse RK9000

Rockwell Jaw Horse

JawHorse

UPDATE: Review and photos of the Jaw Horse in my shed are now available here and here

Fascinating what can be found in overseas magazines, and on their websites! This is a brand new release from Rockwell tools, and for those who know the Superjaws will find an amazing similarity in appearance, specifications, and function (and fwiw, design engineers)!

Some more info, including a Product Sheet (pdf) can be found at Jaw-horse.com and at Rockwell Tools

UPDATE: Review and photos of the Jaw Horse in my shed are now available here and here

Latest writeup here: SSYTC009 Rockwell JawHorse

Rockwell Jawhorse HD RK9000 Workbench System – As Seen on TV!
As seen on TV, this heavy-duty hands-free clamp not only secures workpieces with a rock-solid grip, its wide stable frame instantly provides a go-anywhere workstation to make cuts, drill holes, and more. Hold and cut doors, two-by-fours, two-by-twelves, and odd-shaped objects. Mount miter saws, tile saws, grinders and other tools to wood panels and use the Jawhorse as a sturdy stand. Clamp in a vertical support piece and install crown molding all by yourself.

Do it all and more with this incredibly versatile tool that also folds up for simple storage and transportation.

Rockwell Jawhorse HD RK9000 Workbench System – As Seen on TV!

Rockwell Jawhorse HD RK9000 Workbench System - As Seen on TV!
Miter Saw Station for Jawhorse RK9000
Miter Saw Station for Jawhorse RK9000

Work Table for Jawhorse RD9000
Work Table for Jawhorse RD9000

Welding Jaw for Jawhorse RK9000
Welding Jaw for Jawhorse RK9000

Log Jaw for Jawhorse RK9000
Log Jaw for Jawhorse RK9000

Saddlebag for Jawhorse RK9000
Saddlebag for Jawhorse RK9000

Plywood Jaw for Jawhorse RK9000
Plywood Jaw for Jawhorse RK9000

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