The Story Continues

The DVR XP was just the start of the story (and more recently, the DVR 2024) – a lathe with a direct drive motor.  But not just any motor – a fully computer-controlled compact, powerful, state-of-the-art digital variable reluctance motor.  This provided a significant number of benefits, including a motor that can both sense load and immediately react to load changes to maintain a constant speed. Happens to provide significant power savings as well, seeing as when there isn’t any load, the power consumption of the motor drops right away.  So power is consumed only when needed, and only the amount that is required for the load applied.

The computer can also detect other adverse conditions, such as if the shaft is locked, if the tool is digging in etc, and immediately cuts power to the shaft.  Given the spindle of the motor is the drive for the machine, there is no loss in belts slipping, loss in gearing or other methods to transfer the motor power to the chuck. There is a significant decrease in the amount of noise produced compared to a traditional motor and belt (or gear) solution.

DVR XP

DVR XP

The lathe obviously benefits greatly from having a DVR motor as its power source, but it isn’t the only machine that could.

The next chapter in the story was the introduction of a DVR motor to the ShopSmith PowerPro- the first use of the DVR in an independent manufacture’s product.  (Yes, I know there is a Record branded DVR lathe, but a rebranding doesn’t count!)

ShopSmith PowerPro

ShopSmith PowerPro

Then of course is the DVR Drillpress.  But that is not the only tool that will have the DVR motor added to it. For one, if you own a Nova 1624, there will soon be a DVR package drive that can be retrofitted to this, and other machines so they gain the advantages of the DVR motor.  (Don’t forget remote control, such as the upgrade I did to my XP).  For the 1624, it won’t be a direct drive, but will only use a single belt position, and all the speed changes will be done with the DVR motor alone.  You will still have chisel dig-in sensing, the ability to upgrade to remote control, and the power saving benefits of the DVR motor. Oh, and of course digital speed control through the full RPM range.

1624 Retro Upgrade

1624 Retro Upgrade

Now to the drill press – more info!

Drill Press Sensors

Drill Press Sensors

The extra information makes the drill press even more amazing – and making a drill press amazing is a feat in itself!

The load sensing function allows:

1. Slow Start – The slow start function detects the load on the drill bit. The motor will initially run at a slow speed (to make a small hole) and when a load is detected past a certain threshold the speed will then increase to the predetermined running speed.

2. Breakthrough Detection – Detects at a micro-second level if a breakthrough in material has occurred or not, if it has, then the speed will be increased to reduce the amount of burr/tear out.

3. Tool Analysis – indicates dull or damaged drill bits.

4. Proximity Sensors – detects chuck keys left in drill, proximity of hands and sleeves to the moving tool.

In addition, the DVR smarts means that there is intelligence available with its onboard computer;

Intelligent Speed Selection – no belts to change, you can digitally select your speed or choose your project and materials and drill bit, and allow the DVR Drill Press to do it for you.

Wide speed range – from 100 to 5500 rpm

Drill Depth/Tapping/Reverse Cycle – The tapping cycle uses sophisticated depth sensors to drill until a user defined depth is reached, and when the user lifts the drill press handle, the drill then runs in reverse

Speed Wheel – Activating the handle allows the motor to speed or slow down accordingly

Dull tool indicator

Wireless Remote Enabled – Can take optional accessory wireless wrist remote

USB ready for software updates

On board memory – allows user to store favorite programs and settings – useful in production environment or in returning to set/favorite projects.

Low maintanence – no belts to replace, and mechanically a very simple design with industrial grade electronics.

Full smartphone device integration – software upgrades could be available to allow integration with smartphones for control of panel and integration with project Apps.

Hang on – what was that last point?

Smartphone Integration

Smartphone Integration

Nova DVR 2024

Found some more information this morning on the new DVR 2024 that has obviously gone up overnight.

Not too bad with respects to my (untimely?) purchase of the XP on the same day as the new one was announced in the US. (Whew)  It also sounds like the 2024 is an addition to the range, and not a replacement of the XP.

The top speed has been increased from 3500RPM to 5000RPM, and there are now 10 preset-able favourite speeds, rather than 5.  Onboard capacity has been increased from 16″ to 20″ and outboard (swung head) capacity from 29″ to 33″ (838mm), still with a 2HP DVR motor. (DVR = Digital Variable Reluctance)

There is the new remote control – wrist-mounted and also magnetic so can be attached near where you are working.  On/off and speed control. Compatible with all Nova DVR lathes.

Nova Remote

Big news, is the return of

THE TITAN

The 5″ diameter chuck monster as the behemoth of the Nova Chuck range

Teknatool Nova Titan Chuck

Love that term “behemoth”, but not to be confused with the Polish blackened death metal band of the same name from Gdańsk

The Titan, the Behemoth and the SuperNova

Now I’ve Done It

Nova DVR XP

Pick it up from Carbatec tomorrow!

Also got the cast iron legs to go with it so it can be free standing (which is a necessity for me – nowhere else to put it!)

One of the really cool things with this lathe (and there are plenty!) is the ability rotate the head stock to get better access to what is being turned – especially bowls and the like – large diameter stuff (he he).

The motor is really interesting – it responds very rapidly to load, to maintain constant speed.  By doing so it can achieve some significant power savings – up to 50% over a lathe with a normal motor.  The constant speed is a good thing: not sure if the actual power saving is actually worth anything.  Perhaps if I was scrutinising my power bill, and especially if I was running a business with multiple machines that may have some bearing. For the rest of us, well I may be into smart green solutions, but only where they make good economic sense.

It is a direct drive – there are no gears, no pulleys or belts.  The motor runs directly within the lathe head, and is completely variable speed from 100 to 3500 RPM with 2HP driving the work.

There is a microprocessor also constantly working, monitoring.  If the lathe senses an issue, such as a tool digging in, power is cut instantly.  Guess that will happen a lot with me at the helm!

Of course, on the very day that I buy it, Teknatool go and announce a new one – the Nova DVR 2024.  Probably wouldn’t have made any difference to the choice, especially as it is not yet available, but you always find yourself then trawling for info to see just what you’ve missed out on (if at all).  Yes, the base looks like it comes as part of it (although could still easily be an option), and no real difference except the prettied cover panel.  It has a new remote start (that can be wrist mounted), however this is retrofittable to older DVR lathes.  It is also magnetic so it can connect to near where you are working (if you don’t want it body-mounted). Who knows yet what other differences there are at this stage.  Hopefully like Windows XP, the Nova XP will still remain a very popular choice for many years after its due expiry date!

Nova DVR 2024

%d bloggers like this: