Catching up on Festool

Seems that a few things have come out from Festool recently that I haven’t been across.

First is a high speed oscillating tool, the Vecturo, akin to the Fein Supercut.  It also has a Festool style price tag, but also includes some interesting developments as well, depth stops and blade stabilising.  I haven’t looked into it too far as yet, particularly any side-by-side comparisons with the Fein.

down_os_vecturoos400_563000_p_01a-setdown_os_vecturoos400_563000_a__10aOne of the interesting things in the photo above, is the plate that the blade is resting against is actually magnetic, keeping the blade from vibrating perpendicularly to the cutting oscillations, helping establish a cleaner entry slot.  This also is a depth stop for the blade.  There is another depth stop for circular type blades.

down_os_vecturoos400_563000_a__11aThese can all be removed if you want a more traditional oscillating tool setup.

The next is a redesign to the ETS 150/3 and 150/5, now the ETS EC 150/3 and 150/5

down_se_ets1503a_571870_p_07b-with-systainerThe EC refers to the EC-TEC brushless motor, so it has even more power and runs quieter. At least that would be my expectation if I get to play with one.

A new version of the dust hose, that includes a plug-it cable.  I have the older version, which I find keeps things neat when both powering the tool and extracting dust at the same time.  This version also has a material shroud for extra protection of the hose.  Interested to know if this helps with tool movement, where the external spiral of the hose can catch edges occasionally.  I’m sure the shroud wouldn’t help in the situation where I did damage a hose – doubt the shroud is designed to protect against a few hundred degrees of local heat when my hose got too close to a space heater!

down_s_d2722x35asgq_500269_z_01aFinally, although this isn’t new as such, it is an interesting storage for the various tools.  I keep dropping my sander onto the floor when I catch the hose, so the sander storage would be invaluable!

ae_ucr1000p_498966_a_04a ucr-1000And a small CT17 Cleantec, which would be quite handy connected to the Torque CNC (and overall quite a portable extractor).

zoom__s_ct17e_767992_p_01a_81

There is another small driver, called the TXS, which is seemingly replacing the CXS.  There are always so many new drills and drivers I can’t keep up!

If you are looking for more info on any of the above, have a chat with Anthony over at Ideal Tools – he’s always right across the latest developments in the Festool camp.

All creatures great and small

After completing my set of anatomically correct dinosaurs from MakeCNC, (the other three are in my office already), I then decided to make a pteradactyl as large as I can fit on my machine.  Cut from 12mm thick MDF, it has a full wingspan of 3.3m, and physically measures 2m tip to tip, and 1.2m long.  Despite being skeletal, it is realtively heavy!

It is destined for my daughter’s science class, to hang up in the classroom.

dino-1It really seemed like bones as we put it together.

It would be cool to do one of the anatomically correct ones to the same scale!  I really like the one that has its tail up in the air, which is the velociraptor.  Be awesome to have one of those life sized.  (That isn’t unrealistic, as they are relatively small as we saw in Jurassic Park).  Might scare the bejesus out of any unwarranted visitors in the middle of the night.  The plans only come with 3mm, so I’d have to accurately scale it to suit the 12mm thick material – job for another day.

Back to the large pterodactyl, (called a Flugsaurier Archosaurier on the MakeCNC website, which is German for Pteranodon, a type of pterodactyl).  It took 3 sheets of 12mm x 900×600 MDF, which is not too bad, considering the size!  It was cut with the Amana Tool 3/8″ solid carbide compression bit 46172 from Toolstoday.com I still ran it at 40mm/sec, but with a 3.25mm DOC.  Tabs were 10mmx10mm (still 3D, which made them easier to cut by hitting them with a chisel) to hold the pieces in place during the cut.

What to do next……decisions, decisions.

AWR

Been waiting for this one to come out – the latest edition of Australian Wood Review.  Has my first of a series of articles on CNC machining for small-scaled use.  This one is a 2 page spread as an introduction to the topic.

So this is the second magazine (this one, and ManSpace) that is on shelves currently with an article of mine.  And by Monday, the third will be out – the latest edition of The Shed.

AWR87coverweb_E537D540-09AA-11E5-89FC0635E51EDD1F

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