The B-M Wars – World’s Smallest

A year or so ago, I wrote about the Bunnings-Masters battle that was heating up, with stores being co-located in a decidedly provoking manner (and equally pointless where it comes to community benefit of store-type availability). It would be no different to Burger King and Hungry Jacks stores being placed alongside each other – both have the same menu, same recipe, same prices.

It continues, in an interesting direction. A few years back, I blogged about “The World’s Smallest Bunnings”, about a store I came across in Sydney. Well, there’s now a smaller one. In the Carrum Downs shopping centre, a Bunnings Outdoor was set up, obviously to draw attention away from the local (massive) Masters. I had a look around, and it was pretty spartan.

However, in the meantime, they have received so many queries, that Bunnings have chosen to turn that store into a fully fledged Bunnings store. And I must say, the result is impressive!

It has a tiny floorplate in comparison to a normal Bunnings or Masters, but the product range is incredible. They claim to have about 90% of the range of a normal Bunnings- don’t know if that is quite legit, but what they have, how they have fitted it all in is worth a gander.

There is talk they may build a ‘normal’ Bunnings in the vicinity of the current Masters. Personally, I would be disappointed. For better or worse, Masters is already there, and it is of no benefit to the community for another identical store. This current mini-me Bunnings can definitely stay. It is a useful location (walking distance from the local supermarket, and the carpark), carries a great range in spite of its size, and is a point of difference to the Masters.

I know that opinion won’t matter to Bunnings- it is world domination or nothing, but this is a pretty cool model too, and reminds me more of the local hardware shops of my youth, before the monstrosities became the norm and drove the little hardware stores to extinction.

Nailed It!

Where it comes to project assembly, one aspect can prove rather frustrating – just how slippery two parts become when they have a layer of glue between them.  Once you start tightening up the clamps, it is not uncommon to have the parts slip out of position, so you have to take the whole thing apart, reapply glue, and try again.

Sometimes it just is what it is, and you have to do the best you can.

If you have ever done any carpentry, and used a nail gun for framing, you know how satisfying it can be to get the two parts in their required position and pump a nail straight in.  Good fun 🙂

But it is not like you can take a nail gun to help you with project assembly is it?  After all, even if just using a brad, the head of the brad is quite obvious.

Or perhaps there is.

For my latest project, I did in fact do just that.  While attaching the wooden hinges, I applied some glue, held the hinge in just the right position, and fired a 23 gauge headless pin in to hold it in position. Worked a treat.  And if I hadn’t mentioned it here, if you ever saw the dartboard cupboard, you’d never realise that I had used a micro – pinner to assist with assembly.

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Can you find them?  There are 11 in that photo (and no, they are not covered up by the screws). (Use the full resolution image, which is 3264×4912). I know where they are, and I struggle to see them.

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The gun is the 23 Gauge Freeman Micro Pinner from Professional Woodworkers Supplies.  Costs under $100, and can fire 1/2″, 5/8″, 3/4″, 7/8″ and 1″ headless pins.

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In comparison to the hole created by a standard 16g or 18g brad, the 23g pin is tiny.  You can even tack a match in position, which demonstrates another aspect – the pin is so thin, the risk of splitting is negligible.

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It made the glue-up really easy, and could conceivably be used to attach trim, components (such as here) etc, all virtually invisible.  I won’t claim that you’d use it for every joint in every project – sometimes it is not the best solution, but it works perfectly as a tool when you can utilise it.

The Freeman 23G headless micro-pinner from PWS.  “Nailed it”

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Jess’ perspective

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Robert Sorby Tour

Carbatec are currently conducting a Robert Sorby tour around each of their stores across Australia.  Should be an interesting evening!

Robert_Sorby_Tour_2014Follow the link to see specific dates, and to book into one of the (free) sessions.

Not sure what they will be showing – turning tools for sure, perhaps some of the specialist ones (chatter tools, spiral texture tools), but hopefully some of the interesting chucks as well – eccentric chucks, modular tool rest etc.  Perhaps some of their non-turning tools?  Don’t know – looking forward to finding out!

turnmastertoolsgroupMight have to leave the credit card at home – sounds ‘dangerous’!

Especially if they show that cutting threads is easier than I imagine.

 

 

Web broadcasting video

Received a rather interesting email tonight from Toolstoday.com.  They send out a regular email promoting their latest router bit, video, sawblade etc, (and I subscribe to it – makes a nice break from the mountain of work emails that come through!)

Tonight’s one will look rather familiar 🙂

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(And yes, they did seek my permission to put the video on their YouTube channel – I was more than happy to allow it)

 

 

One hundred and eighty

This is what I spent my weekend making. It features dovetailed joinery, wooden hinges, and shaker-style panel doors.

For the full blow-by-blow, check out the next edition of ManSpace magazine.

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The Shed Magazine

Latest issue has just come out, and I’ve made (a small image) on the cover.

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It is the full running article of the build of the coffee table.

 

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