31 Jan

FWIW, Jan 2014 was the most popular month on Stu’s Shed of all time (which means “for the past 6 1/2 years”)

In addition to the 1800 direct subscribers (who received each of the daily posts directly to their inbox, RSS reader, Facebook etc), the site received a record 46884 visits – an average of 1512 a day.  Friday Jan 3 received 3553 visits alone!

Pretty cool!

Compressed Air Supply

Compressed air and woodworking definitely go hand-in-hand.  There is a whole collection of air tools to use, and they are typically quite a bit cheaper than their electric powered equivalent machines as the energy conversion from electricity to mechanical is done by a single machine (air compressor) rather than each and every tool doing the same (there is a small step of converting the potential energy in the compressed air to mechanical kinetic, but that is pretty simple).

That concept does harp back to the workshops of old, with line drive, belts and pulleys etc, but compressed air is a lot easier to move around the workshop!

Other than nail guns, impact wrenches, sanders etc, there is always the convenience of a burst of compressed air to clean out a cut, clean off a tool, and even to sweep the workshop floor!  I also have a few vacuum clamps that use compressed air to generate significant grip on the component. (Using a venturi effect to produce low pressure, then the atmospheric pressure does the rest).

Getting air around the workshop can either be with long hoses, or in my case I am going to use the RapidAir setup from Professional Woodworkers Supplies.

152558The initial kit provides the tubing, and a bunch of quick-connectors, so running it around the workshop is a ‘breeze’

After running what will effectively be a pneumatic ring main around the workshop, at strategic points there will be individual tap points, to plug the tool straight in.

152559These come with the valve, and aluminium mounting block, so will fit in very well with the workshop layout.

airThis is an approximate layout for the air run, with the air compressor in a shed near the top right corner.  The red squares are air outlets, the circle is an air outlet then connected to a hose reel (which then allows air to be used elsewhere in the back yard)

I might put an outlet up on the mezzanine, and probably one by the drill press.

The ring main then allows a balance of air to each outlet (especially if there is more than one demand on the circuit at the same time), and for others to be easily added for future design changes or needs.

Will probably start installation next weekend.

The Boris Goldberg Kerf Chair

This is pretty cool – a chair created on a CNC machine using kerfing as the technique to give it shape.  Opens one’s eyes to all sorts of possibilities.

Setting up the SawStop

It has been a while coming (sure I could say that about a number of things at the moment!), but I finally had an opportunity to put the SawStop together.

Shot some video of that at the same time, so hopefully that will go into the details more.

First impressions are good, very similar to the TS10L in a lot of ways.

Once it was up, I tweaked the layout a little more.  Still plenty of room for the few machines yet to be moved in (bandsaw, drill press, DVR lathe).  Some things are still not quite in their right place, but as has been observed, lots of room around each machine.

Starting to feel like a workshop out there, especially now with the tablesaw set up.  After I get the current video of the assembly done, there will be more to follow, including finetuning the setup.  One little surprise – despite being a 15A machine (technically 13A), I was surprised it came with a 10A plug  Not that it will make a difference – I still have a 15A circuit available for it.

TS10L

First, apologies to those who have emailed me about the TS10L – sorry that I haven’t gotten back to any of you as yet.

I haven’t seriously investigated what it is worth – new it would be around $3000+.

It is significantly superior to the TSC10HB, both in function and build quality (not that I am saying the TSC10HB is necessarily a bad tablesaw!)  It has 52″ rails, left tilt, biesemeyer fence, quick release low profile fence, weighing 220kg.  Arbor lock for ease of blade change, and dado blade capable (18mm or so capacity) (not to mention the power to drive one easily).  I’m not removing the extra insert to the right of the table, ready for a router on a router mount to be dropped straight in.

It has an impressively small amount of runout – a really accurate machine.

Anyone wanting to have a look before deciding if you seriously want it are welcome (and encouraged)-I prefer to know you are confident in what you are buying! You can also see the saw throughout this site obviously, including videos.

Offers are welcome, as are questions.

Day of the Machine

After taking much of the day to do some family things (beach before, and BBQ after) for Australia Day, I also moved a number of machines into the shed, now that the electrical was completed and therefore the machines wouldn’t get in the way.

Heavy buggers, especially over soft, churned up dirt the backyard has become.  The pallet jack is such an asset – able to lift the heaviest machine easily, and with reasonably wide wheels, can even manage the ground to a certain extent.

Even so, it was too much to move the thicknesser on my own (230 or so kg), so with a brief assistance of a couple of neighbours, it flew across the back yard.

Paying the price for it all now though!

Never-the-less, a good number of moves was achieved – slowly emptying the garage, and the shed starting to take on real character.

Placement/layout is by no means locked in (never is in my shed!), but am roughly placing them still in accordance with the original plan.

What was moved in this time was the Jet lathe (still uncertain about its long term plan), Jet 14″ bandsaw, Torque Workcentre, the workbench, thicknesser.

Power to the People, part 2

I will give a better tour of the shed, and the electrical layout in the near future, but in the meantime – here is a sneak peek.

Photo 25-01-2014 17 49 21Power is entering the shed from under the slab (through a conduit I put in place during the slab pour).  It is coming from a 63A breaker on the main switchboard, to a second 63A breaker on this panel located near the roller door.  There are a number of circuits running off this, including lighting circuits, multiple 10A circuits (5 or 6?), 15A circuits (3). When the electrician comes back after the long weekend, I will get a run down of each circuit and breaker.

Photo 25-01-2014 17 49 29Some of the conduit running away from the switchboard and off around the shed.  All wires potentially susceptible to damage are encased in conduit to protect it.  That is to stop any being damaged, and then causing the metal shed becoming live.

Photo 25-01-2014 17 49 50 Photo 25-01-2014 18 18 20The lighting circuits run to GPOs at each lighting position.  As these light tubes are wired with a standard 10A plug, this makes it very easy to connect the lights, and unplug and remove (and replace) any that ever become faulty.

If you look closely, you’ll notice a GPO on the main cross-beam in the second picture…..

Photo 25-01-2014 17 50 05This is specifically placed here, as it is for the roof-mounted air filtration unit.

Photo 25-01-2014 17 49 39

Then, there is power all around the perimeter (and on the one support post), all double GPOs. You’ll notice the wood trim all round.  This is an alternate to running conduit everywhere, as instead the power is run inside the top hats, and then this is faced with the pine.  I chose skirting board for this – Masters had it on special and it was exactly what I was looking for.  Rounded top face, exactly the right width.  It is screwed in place, so very easy to remove for access to the wiring if ever needed (installing additional points for example?!!!?)  I also chose it because it looked a bit classier than just MDF.  It is raw, so I can always apply a finish if I feel so inspired.

Photo 25-01-2014 17 53 07

In the back corner where the lathe will go, you’ll notice an additional switch in between the two GPOs.  This is an additional isolating switch for the external GPOs on the rear corner of the shed.

Photo 25-01-2014 17 53 25

These are installed to allow an air compressor (and lights) to be plugged in from another shed, so I don’t have to put up with the noise of an air compressor in the main shed.  The isolator switch means I can turn off the air compressor at the end of a session from the main workshop, without having to go out to the other shed.

So that is a bit of an overview.  As machines are rolled in, the number of GPOs becomes better explained, as there are a lot of machines to plug in, without having to resort to power boards and extension cords.

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