The Festool Swordsaw, in the wild

Can’t wait for this to make its way down under!

Sign ‘o’ the Times

Prince-Sign-O-The-Times-500548

In a recent video, you will have seen me using a Promac generator with my new Festool Kapex.  There is more to the story, and it is all about the sine.

Many generators produce an approximation of a sine wave, and for some things, that is good enough.

SteppedPure-1

The problem is a stepped or simulated sine wave is bad news for electronic equipment, and that also goes for the electronics of Festool equipment.

However, this is one of the real advantages of the Promac generator.  It produces a pure sine wave, making it safe for electronic equipment, and Festool as well 🙂

So if you are want to use Festool equipment offsite, or other electronic equipment for that matter, either make sure your generator is high quality, and produces a pure sine wave (and not just an approximation of it), or just get a Promac generator and not have to worry.

Nova Infinity holding mechanism

A general comment I made in an earlier post about the Nova Infinity warrants further clarification about what I like about the Infinity, and what concerns me about another system (as highlighted by the “Easy Chuck”).  Please note, my original article did not make mention of any other specific brand, so this new article is a direct response to the question posed in the comments of the earlier post, which is why it includes reference to the Easy Chuck product.

Please also note, this is my own opinion, and I have not performed any tests or made any formal assessment of either chuck.

easychuck easy2

The Easy Chuck uses a spring loaded key (blue arrow) that engages the underside of the jaw.  The forces experienced by the jaw during operation are exerted directly onto this key (in an outward direction – red arrow)

If that key becomes worn, if the spring becomes weak, what I see is a potential for the jaw to feel engaged to the user, but could be released from the key during operation.  While the chuck is new, not likely to be an issue.  But what happens in years to come as the chuck is heavily used?  Is there a mechanism that positively stops the jaw from being able to fly out if the key disengages?

The Nova Infinity takes a different approach:

MailScreenSnapz001The jaw slides in from the side, so the primary direction of force is resisted by a permanently fixed shoulder.  Furthermore, during normal turning operations, the v-shaped wedge is forced further into the slot, so even if the restraining mechanism fails, normal operation will still restrain the jaw in position. If turning in reverse, then yes, it is again reliant on the mechanism, but all 4 would need to fail, and you tend not to use a lot of force when the lathe is reversed in any case (and most lathes can’t do that).

So two very different approaches to a quick jaw changing chuck.  And the reasoning behind my comment.

BTW, what you can see here is the kit that allows owners of existing jaw sets to be able to upgrade them to make them useable on the Nova Infinity chuck.  Nice that it can also equally be undone as necessary, without any more difficulty than if the jaw you wanted to use was fixed to any other chuck.  Based on this, I’ll probably look at getting a few of the upgrade kits, so pretty much all my jaw sets can be used on the Infinity, and upgrade most of my chucks as well with the retro fit kit..

Apparently, the Infinity system will be available in January next year – might have to add it to a Christmas wish list.  Perhaps Nova should come out with a free wish list card so turners can tick what they would like (new chuck, # retro kits, # jaw upgrade kits), then they can have that given to them for Christmas, and trade it in for the real thing when the sets become available!

Wish

%d bloggers like this: