The Story Continues

The DVR XP was just the start of the story (and more recently, the DVR 2024) – a lathe with a direct drive motor.  But not just any motor – a fully computer-controlled compact, powerful, state-of-the-art digital variable reluctance motor.  This provided a significant number of benefits, including a motor that can both sense load and immediately react to load changes to maintain a constant speed. Happens to provide significant power savings as well, seeing as when there isn’t any load, the power consumption of the motor drops right away.  So power is consumed only when needed, and only the amount that is required for the load applied.

The computer can also detect other adverse conditions, such as if the shaft is locked, if the tool is digging in etc, and immediately cuts power to the shaft.  Given the spindle of the motor is the drive for the machine, there is no loss in belts slipping, loss in gearing or other methods to transfer the motor power to the chuck. There is a significant decrease in the amount of noise produced compared to a traditional motor and belt (or gear) solution.

DVR XP

DVR XP

The lathe obviously benefits greatly from having a DVR motor as its power source, but it isn’t the only machine that could.

The next chapter in the story was the introduction of a DVR motor to the ShopSmith PowerPro- the first use of the DVR in an independent manufacture’s product.  (Yes, I know there is a Record branded DVR lathe, but a rebranding doesn’t count!)

ShopSmith PowerPro

ShopSmith PowerPro

Then of course is the DVR Drillpress.  But that is not the only tool that will have the DVR motor added to it. For one, if you own a Nova 1624, there will soon be a DVR package drive that can be retrofitted to this, and other machines so they gain the advantages of the DVR motor.  (Don’t forget remote control, such as the upgrade I did to my XP).  For the 1624, it won’t be a direct drive, but will only use a single belt position, and all the speed changes will be done with the DVR motor alone.  You will still have chisel dig-in sensing, the ability to upgrade to remote control, and the power saving benefits of the DVR motor. Oh, and of course digital speed control through the full RPM range.

1624 Retro Upgrade

1624 Retro Upgrade

Now to the drill press – more info!

Drill Press Sensors

Drill Press Sensors

The extra information makes the drill press even more amazing – and making a drill press amazing is a feat in itself!

The load sensing function allows:

1. Slow Start – The slow start function detects the load on the drill bit. The motor will initially run at a slow speed (to make a small hole) and when a load is detected past a certain threshold the speed will then increase to the predetermined running speed.

2. Breakthrough Detection – Detects at a micro-second level if a breakthrough in material has occurred or not, if it has, then the speed will be increased to reduce the amount of burr/tear out.

3. Tool Analysis – indicates dull or damaged drill bits.

4. Proximity Sensors – detects chuck keys left in drill, proximity of hands and sleeves to the moving tool.

In addition, the DVR smarts means that there is intelligence available with its onboard computer;

Intelligent Speed Selection – no belts to change, you can digitally select your speed or choose your project and materials and drill bit, and allow the DVR Drill Press to do it for you.

Wide speed range – from 100 to 5500 rpm

Drill Depth/Tapping/Reverse Cycle – The tapping cycle uses sophisticated depth sensors to drill until a user defined depth is reached, and when the user lifts the drill press handle, the drill then runs in reverse

Speed Wheel – Activating the handle allows the motor to speed or slow down accordingly

Dull tool indicator

Wireless Remote Enabled – Can take optional accessory wireless wrist remote

USB ready for software updates

On board memory – allows user to store favorite programs and settings – useful in production environment or in returning to set/favorite projects.

Low maintanence – no belts to replace, and mechanically a very simple design with industrial grade electronics.

Full smartphone device integration – software upgrades could be available to allow integration with smartphones for control of panel and integration with project Apps.

Hang on – what was that last point?

Smartphone Integration

Smartphone Integration

With Eager Anticipation

This is something I have really been looking forward to ever since I heard it was being developed.

As mentioned a ways back, Teknatool (inventors of the 4 jaw self-centreing chuck for wood turning, and the DVR lathe) have turned their attention to other products that could benefit from the significant ease of operation, power and easy variable speed of the DVR motor.

One such product is the drill press, and Teknatool have chosen the Wood show in Las Vegas to demonstrate the prototype.

It is a perfect synergy.

20130730-014918.jpg

The drill press is constantly assessing the drilling operation. If the computer detects anything abnormal, such as a catch (happens often as the drill bit is just exiting the workpiece on the far side, which sometimes results in it simulating a helicopter!), a slipping bit etc, the motor will cut out surprisingly quickly. They use this same feature on the lathe for when the chisel takes too big a bite and catches.

It can detect if your bit is blunt or damaged, or if you’ve gone and caught some clothing around the bit. This is going to be an awesome drillpress!

Complete control over the variable speed, digital speed readout, constant speed with the DVR motor ramping up the power as needed to maintain the speed under load.

Expect around 9-12 months before products start hitting the shelves.

20130730-015033.jpg

20130730-015110.jpg

The display at AWFS is also very interesting – if you look closely at the picture of the chuck on the right, it looks like a SuperNova2, but I suspect this is actually the new interchageable jaw chuck (it doesn’t use twin bolts to hold each jaw on – one set can be slid out, and the next set slid in – toollessly (is that a word?))

20130730-015201.jpg

Interesting to see the accurate digital readout of depth, load set speed etc.  The ability to zero off your drill bit (very important for accurate drilling, given they are all different lengths!)

Given that the motor is direct-drive to the shaft, I was surprised to see that the head is fixed, and cannot tilt, and the table is such a traditional design with a coarse thread height adjustment.  Wasn’t expecting that – it still leaves a margin for inaccuracy if the operator doesn’t level the table properly.

It may be that this is an example of the head-only model (will seek clarification) – they are first releasing the drillpress head, so you can upgrade your existing drill press, and then down track releasing a full drillpress model.  Upgrading an existing drill press will obviously be cheaper, but you have to wonder what innovations Teknatool will bring to the lower half of the drill press!

***Update*** I can confirm that this specific example was a DVR drill press head mounted on an existing base, and is not an example of the full Teknatool/Nova Drillpress solution.

Irrespective, the addition of DVR technology into the drill press is a massive step forward, and I am certainly looking forward to the next tool to receive the DVR treatment – the tablesaw is certainly in their sights. Will this become a serious contender to the SawStop?  The DVR motor may be capable of providing that sort of capability, and without the blade destruction of an aluminium brake slamming into the blade teeth.  Of course I am speculating wildly!

In any case, I can’t wait to see the new drillpress on the market!

SSYTC051 & 52 More GoPro Trials

The first video is using the fly-jig, with an additional wire now (as pictured recently) for additional stability.  The second wire will also allow panning effects, by offsetting the attachment points in relation to the main line.  There is still some shake that I haven’t been able to solve – wind is the primary culprit, so this jig is probably more of an interior-only variety.  There will still be more I can do to stabilise it – I’ll just have to think what that is!  Raising the camera so it is directly opposite the line, rather than below it will help a little.  Having some damper system on the line(s) to minimise vibration transmission is probably the next target.  Further slowing the period of oscillation of the jig (in the same way as a pendulum is controlled, or a spring-system) will also help.  Further increasing line tension would help too, but that will require some modification to the jig itself to cope with the increased rigidity that the tension would cause. (BTW, the timelapse is over approximately 20 minutes, not that there is much to watch – a few clouds and growing grass!)

SSYTC052 More GoPro Trials

The second jig is a skate jig.  It uses the same type of motor (30 RPM at 12V) driving directly on one of the wheels.  The camera was used to get the shot, so was notably absent, but is fixed via a tripod screw through the hole that can be seen near the battery.  This jig is either used to run on a smooth surface or track.  It will be interesting to see how easy it is to create a track that it can follow. Vibration is much less of a problem, but getting overhead shots is its limitation.

SSYTC051 More GoPro Trials

There are commercial solutions, but they often can operate over 1m or so, and/or are prohibitively expensive. Cheaper (non motorised) ones are out there – will keep searching for better options.

9 Minutes part 2

Anthony has asked a very interesting question which has caused much food for thought.

Instead of a slab, he asked if I had considered screw pilings.  No need for the slab specifically, I’d loose a bit of shed height by installing a wooden floor (not that I don’t have a few metres spare!)

The end result could look a lot more like the Ideal Tools workshop that I was always so envious of!

An Ideal Workshop

An Ideal Workshop

There is no specific requirement to have a concrete floor, and as Anthony pointed out, it would make running services significantly easier, including having in-floor GPOs (power) right at the tool, and under-floor dust extraction.  That alone would be significant – imagine walking around a workshop with all the large machines and not having to trip over cables and ducting!

Not sure how much screw pilings cost, but definitely worth some serious investigation!

As to the timber for the floor?  There are some different options.  One is to make it out of solid timber, but that would be a phenomenal cost.  However, there other choices.  Such as laying a floor of yellow-tongue, then overlaying it with a product like Gerflor.  Another option is to use some of the timber I recovered from the Menzies Building (Tassie Oak).  I have about 52m2 of it, but that is full thickness (45mm).  If it was resawed, I would still have 20mm of timber on top of the yellow-tongue, and still have about 1/2 my timber for projects.  Hmmm.

GerflorGerflorElm GerflorWalnut

9 Minutes

Another small milestone has been passed – I now have an exact partslist and specifications sheet for the shed, along with a diagram of the required slab and footings.

Interesting point – the structure has around 2900 fasteners (majority self tapping screws), and will weigh almost 2 tonnes (not counting the slab obviously!)

The concrete slab (including footings) I have calculated to require 6m3 of concrete – approx 13 tonnes (wet).  That allows 100mm thick slab, with an additional 300x300x300 footing under each column, and 300x300x500 footings under each column that supports the mezzanine.

Time to start looking at concreters, and finding out about pump trucks.  Also, I want to have a chat to an electrician and plumber to see what needs to be considered before the pour, because once the slab is down, there is no adding electrical ducts, drains, or under-floor dust extraction.

Finally – so much to think about!

Toy Library (for the slightly older kid)

I recently became aware of a tool library that has started in Brunswick, called (funnily enough), the Brunswick Tool Library!

The principle behind it is very similar to Toy Libraries – for an annual fee, you can come in and borrow 7 tools/week.  Unlike a hire company, there is no daily rates, no need to try to have the job all ready for when you hire the equipment to get maximum use out of it.  You can borrow one or two items occasionally, or an unusual tool that you can’t justify owning for that very occasional need.

The fee isn’t exorbitant either – $60/year isn’t going to break the bank.

WP-Header-ImageI’m sure, based on their likely success, that their catalogue of tools (and quality versions) will continue to grow.

Hopefully they have the insurance side of things all sorted (you’d assume so!)

So a great idea, worth supporting, and perhaps…..worth cloning!

Living Vicariously Through the Workshops of Others

I know that in the past, some have used Stu’s Shed to provide a sort of “shed away from home” as it were, including some in the US Navy, overseas placements etc, but recently that table has had to be turned.  At least for a bit!

Michael would be well known to subscribers of the Professional Woodworkers Supplies newsletter, and has recently been building a wooden rocking horse.  Its a Grandfather’s lot in life 🙂

Some rocking horses are made as lifelike as possible, some are made very simply – a few boards cut out with a jigsaw or similar and glued together.  The one that Michael has made borrows concepts from both camps – and produces a rocking horse that will definitely be loved, and played with.

In Michael’s words:

Just sent my latest project out to PASTURE (read as PAINTING)
My mate is going to polyurethane it in white.
Then I’ll design and fit the leather ears, a leather saddle and bridle.
Biggest task was achieving the angle of the legs that are glued to the body.
Had to make a jig and with my router on a saddle and achieved a perfect finish
Used a ton of glue having used 19 mm board. The body and head is 76mm, every thing else is 39mm.

 

image image-1 image-2 photo-1 photoLooks great – keen to see what it looks like all finished!

%d bloggers like this: