It’s Time

At the Melbourne Working with Wood Show I had taken a slice of burl, and used the Torque Workcentre to start surfacing it as a demo of the TWC, and the idea quickly progressed as the timber talked, that it would make an interesting (large) desk or mantlepiece clock.

That block of burl has been sitting in my shed ever since, waiting for the project to be completed.  And after 6 months since the show, I finally got around to doing just that.

At the Wood Show, I had bought the clock mechanism I needed (from Carrolls Woodcraft Supplies) with an extra-long shaft, so I could keep the burl as thick as possible.  So back in the shed, I did some final passes with a surfacing bit on the back of the burl to get it to the final thickness I needed.  I could have used a drum sander with twin passes per layer, but it would have taken a LONG time.  And the thicknesser would have had all sorts of problems on the gnurly grain, even if it could fit.  So the TWC is by far and away the best tool for the job.

Cutting out the square mortise in the back for the clock can be done a number of different ways, router, chisel,  oscillating cutter. But when there is a tool specifically designed for cutting a mortise, why not use that!

Testing the clock fit, and with some real minor tweaking, it was a very successful method.

And seeing the Domino was out of the box, it was also perfect for attaching the stand to the back of the burl. (An offcut taken from the burl early on)

It sticks out over the bottom, ready to be cut off, then sanded flush.

Next will be finishing the front face, attaching the clock and shifting it to its final location.

Update, for those who missed it, here are some photos of the burl near original size being flattened.

Starting the burl surfacing

Revealing a surface, 5mm at a time

When I first got the idea of the clock

Offcut that will become the clock stand

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