ROS, TWC: TLA Heaven

To translate: you can now fit a number of Random Orbital Sanders to the Torque Workcentre!

What I have here is a prototype, but actual versions should not be too far off. Fits Bosch, Triton, DeWalt, Milwaukee and I’m sure there are plenty of others with a similar body.

ROS Attachment for TWC

Where a random orbital sander is used as a finishing device with a fine-grit sandpaper, it is not a stock removal tool, and it removes enough material to end up with a smooth surface, but not necessarily flat (and that is fine when at the final finishing stages).

On the other hand, if you want to use one for flattening a surface it is just not possible….until now.

Load the ROS with 80, 60 or even 40 grit, and with the tool mounted in the TWC, it will be kept at the same level across the entire surface, allowing the ROS to flatten out the peaks, lower and repeat until the surface is flat.

It could also help dust clearance, preventing clogging as the grit in the paper is touching and cutting, not the entire paper resting on the surface.  It can also decrease the amount of heat generated for the same reason.  And one other benefit, if you are often too heavy-handed with the ROS, you can prevent it achieving a fully random sanding effect – having your focus changed to moving the ROS across the surface rather than pushing it down into the surface will produce a better result.

I’d still use the ROS handheld for fine finishing – this is more a bulk material removal and flattening technique with the ROS mounted to the TWC.

Just another attachment that improves the already impressive functionality of the Torque Workcentre.

3 Responses

  1. Using the Torque Workcentre, is not woodworking (in my opinion anyway) Its like having a robot doing the work for you.

    • ya just can’t please everyone!

    • How so- how is it not woodworking in the normal sense? There are no motors (other than in the router or other tool), no pulleys, no gears, no computers.

      There is no difference between woodworking with a tablesaw that has a fence, or more specifically a sliding extension table, or the torque.

      You are bringing the tool to the work rather than the other way around, but how does that differ from using a Festool saw on a Festool rail?

      Unless you expect everyone to do everything freehand, then this is no less woodworking than any other machine method.

      This is not a CNC machine like the Shark.

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