Toy Clock Design

I’ve just been playing around in AutoCAD designing a toy clock for the Holmesglen Toymaking course that I am running end of November.

Here’s a quick look at progress so far:

Toy Clock

Toy Clock

The idea is that each of the removable numbers will have a number on them – possibly carved – haven’t decided!  They will be made from a piece of dowel, and the holes cut with a forstner bit.  The overall clock cut out on the bandsaw using a circle cutting jig, and at the rear of the clock there will be a stand that folds away so the clock can either be used flat on a table, standing up on a table, or hung on a wall.

Overall dimension is 300mm diameter for the clock, with each number being 20mm diameter.

One (good) suggestion is to fit magnets underneath each number – definitely sounds like a good idea (so long as they are affixed strongly enough – do not want a child eating one – or rather eating more than one – that is very dangerous.  However, if mounted properly, this isn’t a problem.)

I’m also now thinking about how I could have a removable mechanism so when it is not being played with, and is hanging on the wall, that it actually works as a real clock.

Update on Scheppach Planer Jig

All 380’s are now sold, and there are only two 320’s left.  If you want one for $100, you better be quick!

Update 2:

I had a quiet bet with myself that I could have all the units sold by the end of the day, and they are – all gone.  Not that I get anything from that (and I bought one myself remember!) but I did mention it to a couple of very dubious Carbatec staff yesterday 🙂

Perhaps I should be in retail after all!!

‘Slacking off’ as a Safety Mechanism

Gary Rogowski (woodworker (insert a long list of relevant titles here) and star of a number of woodworking DVDs) makes a great point on his blog in a post titled “Habits for your Stupid Days“.

As I replied to his post:

Some great points there – I particularly like that you have formalised the whole concept that there are a list of tasks for days when you just know it would be a little bit silly to even turn a tool on (and recognising that fact).

In my (modest) shop, I have a couch, a TV hooked up to an iPod with a stack of movies (and DVDs by….Gary Rogowski!), and a number of activities I can do there (sharpening, sketching plans etc) for just those days that I am too tired, too distracted, or it is simply too late to make a lot of noise.

However, until reading you post I didn’t realise that this is a perfectly valid safety tool, and not just slacking off!! )

Planer Blade Sharpening Jig

I happen to glance at the sales table in Carbatec today, and completely forgot what I had actually gone in to get (scrollsaw blades).

On the table were (and are still there as of closing time), a small pile of Scheppach Planer Blade Attachments for the TiGer 2000 and 2500 wet stone grinders.  Of course this means they also fit the Triton, and Tormek.

Scheppach 380

Scheppach 380

What really caught my eye was that they were down from $306 to $100.  I never thought I’d actually have one of these, but at that price, I couldn’t refuse.

Initially it looked like they were all the Scheppach 320, but then I noticed some were the 380.  So I took one of those!  There are still about 2 of the 380s left, and about 4 or so of the 320s, all for $100 each.  (FWIW, the 380 is currently listed on another suppliers site at $350)

The Model 380 actually means it can handle a blade 380mm long (although in fact it is closer to 400mm), so a 15″ thicknesser blade is no problem.  It is not just planer blades it can take either – (narrow) chisels, hand plane blades etc all can fit.

The Model 320 can handle a 320mm blade (12.5″)

At that price, I don’t think they will be there very long, so if you want one, I’d be heading down to Carbatec (Melbourne) PDQ.

To prove the point, I’ve documented fitting it to the Triton:

Scheppach 380 Rods

Scheppach 380 Rods

The first time you set this up you need to assemble the unit.  Shown here is fitting the height adjustments and main supports for the jig.  They are in about 60% of the way , with the flat front face towards the screw.  They have a threaded height adjustment which is pretty cool.  Now I know they are upside down here (the adjustment knobs), but that is deliberate on my part.  This way, the adjustment knob pushes firmly on the top of the unit, rather than the thin shaft portion of the knob kind of half going down the hole.  That isn’t a problem on the TiGer 2500, but here I thought it better just to turn the knob over.

Scheppach 380 Bed

Scheppach 380 Bed

Next, the main track is added….

Scheppach 380 Support

Scheppach 380 Support

….and then an upright to provide a bit of extra stability (this isn’t part of the 320)

Scheppach 380 Blade Holder

Scheppach 380 Blade Holder

The tool holder then slips on, and it is a very smooth setup indeed.  This glides back and forth over the wheel, and because of the length of the track, easily covers the entire width required for the large thicknesser blades.

Scheppach 380 Stops

Scheppach 380 Stops

One very cool aspect of this tool are the stops (one as shown).

Scheppach 380 Complete

Scheppach 380 Complete

Here is the competed unit, ready for its first victi………uh….blade.

Scheppach 380 Unit

Scheppach 380 Unit

The ‘arm’ raised up for inspection, maintenance, fitting a new blade (and posing for the photo!)  Note the number of hold-down knobs, so a very even pressure can be applied along the entire length of a blade.

Scheppach 380 Toolrest

Scheppach 380 Toolrest

Here you can see just how close you can get the portion of the jig that actually holds the blade to the grinding stone. It doesn’t appear to be close enough to take those tiny planer blades from something like a handheld power planer, but it would easily cope with something like the blade from a Triton thicknesser.

Scheppach 380 Tools

Scheppach 380 Tools

Here you can see the jig being used to hold a standard chisel.  It can’t cope with one that is particularly thick, I could get away with this one for example.  I am going to be interested in finding out just what else can fit this jig!

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