A better sander

The sanding disk on my 2 in 1 Triton sander was getting quickly worse, with little sanding and more burning, no matter how often I tried the reconditioning rubber stick trick.

The cutting ability of the sanding disk had finally been exhausted – it was blunt.  Given that it was silicon carbide, which chips revealing new cutting edges, it means it had pretty much run out of carbide altogether.

Now before applying a new disk, you have to completely clean off all the glue from the old one, and given this glue is strong and gunky, I really don’t relish the task (and thus why the disk was so far gone).

So instead of having to do this more than once, I decided to upgrade the tool at the same time, with a velcro disk (yes, it actually is velcro) from Carbatec.  It is a pretty low cost fix, and will save a lot of grievance in the future.  Velcro can’t take the same level of heat abuse from oversanding (or rather overpressure during the sanding), so I’m going to have to use it without abusing it, but that isn’t such a bad thing.

Removing original disk

Removing original disk

Step 1 was removing the original disk that had expired and clean all the residual glue off.  It was as much fun as I expected.

Attached Velcro Surface

Attached Velcro Surface

Step 2 The velcro disk is attached.  In this case it was an 8″ disk – cost $18 from Carbatec.

New Silicon Carbide Disk Attached

New Silicon Carbide Disk Attached

New carbide disk attached – cost $5.50.  In this case it is an 80 grit, but there is obviously a whole range available, and easily swappable now with the velcro backing.

2 in 1 back in service

2 in 1 back in service

Aldi and an unexpected shed upgrade

Was in Aldi earlier today (don’t shop there much, but their nappies are pretty good, and a reasonable price).  Came home with a bit more than I expected – an upgrade for the shed!

One of their ‘special’ buys at the moment is rubber flooring 6 pack for $20.  I bought a couple of sets – thought it would be good for reducing fatigue while standing at some of the tools for extended periods of time.  After laying what I had, I went straight back down for one more pack to finish the job – it covered more area than I expected, so instead of covering an area in front of a couple of the major tools as was my original plan, I found that just one more pack would pretty much cover the whole tool area.  (Each pack is 2.3m^2)

So now I have a nice soft surface to stand on while working in the tool section of the shop.  I don’t know how durable the surface is – only time will tell, but if it comes to that I could always put a thin ply (or similar) layer over the top.  It was very easy to lay – took minutes, so if I need to, it can be lifted to move a tool around.  Also, if some sections start wearing excessively, it will be a very easy and quick job to swap the worn sections for the less worn areas.

Aldi Rubber Flooring Pack

Aldi Rubber Flooring Pack

Laying the flooring

Laying the flooring

Flooring under saw and lathe

Flooring under router table, bandsaw and drillpress

Flooring under router table, bandsaw and drillpress

Not only does the flooring go together very easily, there is a generous supply of edging to give a finished look to the job.

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